Dog Grooming at Home

Grooming your puppy isn’t just about keeping up your pooch’s degree of tidiness, and it isn’t just about keeping your canine attractive. Grooming your puppy is keeping canine’s physical wellbeing just as her appearance. To do this you must begin training your dog to endure grooming while she is still a puppy. If you wait too long to begin the grooming sessions, your puppy may not be agreeable to it later on.   Another benefit of grooming is that it allows you to check your dog for any abnormalities. This includes skin problems such as ticks, fleas and dry patches.

Gather supplies. 

You don’t want to be running around looking for cleaning products with a wet dog in the tub, so have everything in one place before you start. You should also make sure that you’re properly dressed in clothes you don’t mind getting messy because you will get wet.  Here are some things that you might need. 

Comb out your dog first.

 Combing your puppy’s coat daily or every other day will keep most mats. Simply brushing, as most literature instructs, is not enough for dogs that can mat up: the brush will easily pass over at angles that a comb will get stuck on. A thorough combing should always be the first step of the grooming process because any mats will become tighter and less manageable once they dry. Begin on the head and move down the body. Be careful under the belly, as it is a sensitive area, and don’t forget to comb the tail.

Give the dog breaks as needed.
You don’t want the dog to get overwhelmed; any negative associations can make grooming harder in the future. Make the experience fun by giving your pet breaks from time to time, giving praise, treats, pets, and even a little bit of play. This will also keep your dog distracted.

Cut out mats that can’t be brushed out.
Severe matting can pull the skin every time the dog moves, making daily life painful for your pet. If you can’t brush a mat out, you need to either cut or shave it off, depending on how close it is to the skin. Be extremely careful if you use scissors to avoid injuring yourself or your pet. Try to cut parallel to the growth of the hair to avoid a choppy look.

Clean the dog’s eyes.
Depending on your particular dog, this step may be a simple matter of wiping or pulling eye debris away from the corners of the eyes.

Clean your dog’s ears.
It’s normal for a clean ear to have some wax in it, but there shouldn’t be any particular smell to it. To clean your dog’s ears, apply some ear cleaning solution (bought at a pet supply store) to a cotton round. Not too much or it will drip into the ear while wiping. Wipe dirt and wax away from the inner ear, but don’t rub vigorously, as this might cause sores. Don’t push too far into the ear, either. 

Clip the dog’s nails.
If left untrimmed, a dog’s nails can curl under into the paw pads or twist toes in a way that causes joint damage. To keep your dog’s nails short, clip them regularly, depending on how fast his nails grow. If you can hear his nails on the ground when he walks, that means his nails are touching the ground, and are too long. [4]

What to Do